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LIST  December 2013

LIST December 2013

Subject:

Re: Soviet 1945 attack on Japan

From:

John McGlynn <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

NBR's Japan Forum <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sat, 21 Dec 2013 12:21:30 +0900

Content-Type:

text/plain

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Gregory Clark:
Very interesting.
Is it this?
Breaking Japanese Diplomatic Codes
David Sissons and D Special Section during the Second World War
Edited by Desmond Ball and Keiko Tamura
http://epress.anu.edu.au/titles/asian-studies-series/breaking-japanese-diplomatic-codes
If yes, note to all that it can be viewed for free (PDF or online).
JM

> A recent monograph from the Australian National University - Breaking
> Japanese Diplomatic Codes - throws even stronger light on the Hasegawa
> Tsuyoshi 'Racing the Enemy' thesis that Moscow in 1945 sought eagerly to
> delay Japan's surrender to the Allies in order to facilitate its own
> attack into Manchuria. Its main technique was to encourage an obtuse
> Japanese establishment to believe that the USSR might somehow use good
> offices with the Allies, and so encourage a surrender delay.
>
> The monograph deals mainly with the techniques used by Australian code
> breakers through to 1945.  But it includes, almost as an aside,  a
> fascinating detail which was new to me and maybe to some NBR members,
> namely:
>
>  From Verona we knew long ago that Soviet agents in Australia in 1945 were
> getting material from pro-Soviet sources in Australia's department of
> External Affairs in Sydney, one of which almost certainly was Allan
> Dalziel, secretary to then External Affairs minister Evatt.   Included
> were plans for the US attack on the Philippines gained from MacArthur's
> headquarters in Australia.
>
> What we (or at least I) did not know was that through Australian decoding
> of messages to Tokyo from the Japanese consulate in Harbin,  these plans
> were then passed on by Moscow to Tokyo via that Harbin consulate. The
> Soviet aim in handing over the plans to the Japanese was to help Japan
> resist the planned US attack and so delay Japan's surrender. But it also
> helped feed the delusion that Moscow had good will to Japan.
>
> We knew that Stalin was devious.  But that devious?
>
> The Dalziel connection only became public in Australia in 1954 following
> the Petrov affair. But no legal action was taken against him or his
> alleged helpers  - two of whom were still working in External Affairs
> (though under a cloud) when I joined in 1956.  The fact that their
> activities could have caused significant Allied casualties during the
> invasion of the Philippines was never revealed.
>
> Perhaps one reason for not acting against them more severely was that
> Australian decoding of Japanese diplomatic and other materials continued
> postwar.  More deviousness? They were finally revealed in 1976 by an
> Australian Financial Review journalist, Brian Toohey.
>
> Strangely the Toohey story was ignored in Japan, until I wrote about it
> two years later in a book published by Simul. More Japanese obtuseness?
>
> Incidentally, the Hasegawa book reveals an incredible 1945 offer by Hirota
> Koki to Malik, then Soviet ambassador in Japan, to have the USSR join with
> Japan in a war against the invading Allies (Hasegawa,  while showing the
> extent to which Moscow was feeding Japanese delusions the USSR might act
> as intermediary to end the war, does not seem to know about the Harbin
> connection).
>
> But before we ridicule the Hirota delusions, allow me to mention something
> even more extraordinary less than 20 years later.  As an Australian
> Embassy first secretary in Moscow  I was present in the Kremlin in October
> 1964 when an Australian foreign minister, Paul Hasluck, set out to
> persuade Kosygin and Gromyko to join the West in opposing alleged Chinese
> 'aggression' in Vietnam.
>
> I have reason to believe it is very likely Hasluck was put up to this by
> Washington which, like many others,  had misread the Sino-Soviet dispute
> as proof that a moderate Moscow was in deadly dispute with a militaristic
> Beijing.
>
> (In fact the dispute was caused by Moscow reneging on its offer of nuclear
> help to China following the US threat to use nuclear weapons in the 1958
> Offshore Islands dispute - a threat relevant to the current and very
> understandable Chinese dislike of having US naval vessels still patrolling
> its waters, by the way. I give more details both of this and the Hasluck
> demarche in my 1968 book 'In Fear of China',  and on my website.)
>
> As with the Harbin revelations, few in Australia's sleepy foreign affairs
> academic establishment have shown much interest in these details.  It was
> a US academic, Peter van Ness, who brought the very important Harbin
> material to my notice.
>
> Gregory Clark
> www.gregoryclark.net
>
> ########################################################################
>
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